PUBLISHER
Robyn McCloskey 765-454-8563
MANAGING EDITOR
Jeff Kovaleski 765-454-8590
ASSISTANT
MANAGING EDITOR
Misty Knisely 765-454-8578
ASSISTANT EDITOR
Rob Burgess 765-454-8577
ADVERTISING SALES
Debbie Downing 765-459-3121, Ext. 8270
Laurie Delaplane 574-722-5000, Ext. 5161
PHOTOGRAPHY
Tim Bath, Kelly Lafferty, Steve Summers
WRITERS
Ken de la Bastide, Lindsay Eckert, Sarah Einselen,
Carson Gerber, Megan Graham, Amie Sites,
Scott Smith, Lindsey Ziliak
EDITORIAL DESIGN
Rodney Ogle, Rachel Brantley, Addie Howell
COPY EDITORS
Misty Knisely, Rob Burgess
CONTACT US
Heartland regional magazine is published six times
each year by Community Newspapers. Questions or
comments can be submitted to 300 N. Union St.,
Kokomo, IN 46901 or call 765-456-3821
or 1-800-382-0696
Misty Knisely,
Assistant Managing Editor, Heartland magazine
6
heartland
| january-february 2013
hear tl
and
W
orking at a local publication, you tend to
know just about everything happening
around you and a good chunk of an area’s
history, too. And having lived here for
almost nine years, I thought I was pretty well-versed in
both.
But working on this first edition of Heartland magazine,
I realized that’s not the case.
Did you know that hiding beneath decades of junk and
innumerable pigeon droppings, there’s an opera house in
Delphi? I didn’t.
The junk is from the building’s many inhabitants over
the hundred or so years: a grocery store, a department
store owner, a barber, a real estate
agent. The droppings, however, were
the result of broken windows that
allowed pigeons to roost in the dilap-
idated balcony on the third floor.
Regardless of how it got there, it
will all be going away as work is
under way to restore the opera house
to the beauty it was in 1882, when it
opened on the third floor of the
Delphi City Hall. Don’t let that name fool you though. It
wasn’t a government building, but rather a citywide gath-
ering place. In fact, its first event was a welcome-home
ball for returning Civil War soldiers.
You can read all about the building’s long history and
future in this first issue of Heartland. If you want even
more history, check out the story on Ernest Hiatt and his
Coleman Lantern Museum in Rochester. Packed into three
rooms, he displays more than 64,000 pieces that tell the
history of the Coleman Co. and its founding family.
In the coming editions of Heartland, we’ll shine a spot-
light on the histories of Carroll, Cass, Fulton, Howard,
Miami, Pulaski, Tipton and White counties.
We’ll also share stories of the people who call them
home and happenings around the area. We’ll also help
you stay fit by focusing on a health topic each issue.
In this issue, we turn our focus to starting a healthy life-
style early. We help you get the kids off the couch and intro-
duce you to a program designed specifically for getting sed-
entary children on the move. For the older readers, we’ll
show you how to not develop heart disease in the first place.
So take a look around our first issue, and we hope to
see you next time.
TO OUR READERS
hear tland
VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1